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Installing BART 2.1

BART's a great tool for managing your backups--it's robust and contains neat features like incremental backup.  We recently assisted a customer who was having issues installing BART 2.1 because of some missing dependencies, and I'd like to share some of the knowledge that we were able leverage in order to help with the situation.  Specifically, most users are able to use Yum to install our RPMs, but if you're not able to, this article might help you!

 

In the instructions for BART 2.1, found here:

 

https://www.enterprisedb.com/resources/edb-product-documentation/edb-backup-and-recovery-21-guide

 

it states that there is some required software in order for BART 2.1 to install and run properly:

 
  • Postgres libpq library
  • Postgres pg_basebackup utility program
  • For RHEL/CentOS 6, Boost Libraries version 1.48
  • For RHEL/CentOS 7, Boost Libraries version 1.53

So where can we find these files? The good news is, the Postgres libpq library and the Postgres pg_basebackup program are part of the default Postgres or EPAS installation, so we won't need to worry about those. What we are missing is the Boost Libraries, and without them, we will get the following error(s):

> rpm -ivh edb-bart-2.1.0-1.rhel6.x86_64.rpm
error: Failed dependencies:
libboost_chrono-mt.so.1.48.0()(64bit) is needed by edb-bart-2.1.0-1.rhel6.x86_64
libboost_filesystem-mt.so.1.48.0()(64bit) is needed by edb-bart-2.1.0-1.rhel6.x86_64
libboost_iostreams-mt.so.1.48.0()(64bit) is needed by edb-bart-2.1.0-1.rhel6.x86_64
libboost_serialization-mt.so.1.48.0()(64bit) is needed by edb-bart-2.1.0-1.rhel6.x86_64
libboost_system-mt.so.1.48.0()(64bit) is needed by edb-bart-2.1.0-1.rhel6.x86_64
libboost_thread-mt.so.1.48.0()(64bit) is needed by edb-bart-2.1.0-1.rhel6.x86_64
libboost_timer-mt.so.1.48.0()(64bit) is needed by edb-bart-2.1.0-1.rhel6.x86_64

 

In order to prevent this, we will first have to install EPEL (Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux) in order to be able to later install the Boost Libraries. The command

> yum install epel-release

Should get you the package, but if you would like to download the RPM file manually, the Fedora Project manages EPEL, and you can download it from their site. 

 

Once those are installed, there are two ways we can go about this:

 

1) Through the terminal interface:

After having installed EPEL, you should be able to see the Boost Library files in yum:

> yum search boost
boost148-chrono.i686 : Run-Time component of Boost Chrono library
boost148-chrono.x86_64 : Run-Time component of Boost Chrono library
...
boost148-wave.i686 : Run-Time component of Boost C99/C++ pre-processing library
boost148-wave.x86_64 : Run-Time component of Boost C99/C++ pre-processing library

Install the packages:

> yum install boost148-chrono.x86_64 boost148-filesystem.x86_64 boost148-iostreams.x86_64 boost148-serialization.x86_64 boost148-system.x86_64 boost148-thread.x86_64 boost148-timer.x86_64

And you should be able to install BART 2.1 now.

>  rpm -ivh edb-bart-2.1.0-1.rhel6.x86_64.rpm
Preparing...                ########################################### [100%]
   1:edb-bart               ########################################### [100%]

 

 

2) Manually download from the EnterpriseDB yum repository:

 

http://yum.enterprisedb.com/

 

And under "Dependencies", there's a few options available:

  1. If you would like to pick and choose which dependecies to download and install, you can use the "RHEL/CentOS/Scientific Linux" links for your version (6 or 7) to go into the RPM repository and select the ones you would like to download. Once you are in the RPM repository, you can see the list of Boost Library files by selecting the "B" in the "Jump to letter" list on the top right. 
  2. If you would like to have all of the dependecies downloaded in a single tarball, you can click the "Tarball - RHEL/CentOS/Scientific Linux" links for your version and it will download a tarball that contains all of the dependecies, to include the Boost Libraries. You can then untar the package and install the Boost Libraries.

Personally, I would recommend installing all of the Boost Library RPMs, to be on the safe side. 

 

 

I hope this article is helpful, and please feel free to post if you have any questions!

 

 

 

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Revision #:
14 of 14
Last update:
‎05-04-2018 12:12 PM
Updated by:
 
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